Reviewers needed for Monmouth Junior Science Symposium

December 17th, 2015

Each year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory and the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium (NJSGC) assists the Monmouth Junior Science Symposium (MJSS) recruit paper reviewers and selectors, mentors and judges. MJSS is the regional host for the Department of Defense sponsored 54th National Junior Science & Humanities Symposium (JSHS). The goal is to keep the best and brightest science-minded high-school students loving science so that they’ll go on pursuing a future in science, hopefully conducting much-needed research. The students conduct science-based research projects, prepare papers of their findings and present the results of their research at the Symposium in March. The students are recognized for outstanding achievement with awards and scholarships and can go on to compete in the national competition. Last year, the MJSS students had great success at the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium. None of this would have been possible, if it weren’t for your support as reviewers, mentors and judges! Read More …

Rutgers Program brings polar science to classroom

December 10th, 2015

Marine Educators at Rutgers University, a member of the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium, will be working over the next three years to bring more opportunities to 6-9th grade students and teachers to interact with polar scientists and polar research through our National Science Foundation-funded program Polar ICE, or Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education.

Interested in getting involved in Polar ICE through one of the up coming opportunities for teacher professional development? Consider participating in the polar themed EARTH workshop that they will be hosting in New Brunswick from July 24-29.

The purpose of the workshop is to:

  • Educate, excite, and engage teachers with the concept of observatory (surface, benthic, and pelagic) data in the classroom
  • Develop curricula enabling teachers and students to utilize near-real-time data (developed by the participating teachers during the workshop based on the research of the scientists)
  • Increase scientific literacy in microbial oceanography
  • Produce leaders in the next generation of microbial oceanographers by providing state-of-the art training

If that sounds like something you would be interested in, the application consists of:
1) Cover letter that includes the following information: your school/district, grade level/s, subject/s taught, and email/phone contact (both school and personal as the school email system sometimes rejects our group emails). Please also address the following questions: Why do you want to be selected for this workshop? What makes you the ideal candidate?;
2) Completed feedback on an activity that you’ve trialed in the classroom (activities: http://www.mbari.org/earth/lesson_grid.htm, feedback form:https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/EARTH_lesson_feedback).

The complete application should be sent to George Matsumoto at EARTH@mbari.org and the deadline is January 29th, 2016.

Shop Amazon smile and give NJSGC a boost

December 2nd, 2015

Will you be using Amazon this holiday season? If so, please consider using AmazonSmile for your purchases.  When you select the consortium as your charity, Amazon will donate a portion of the amount you spend to us.

Using AmazonSmile is exactly like using regular Amazon.  To begin shopping, just go to smile.amazon.com and type in New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium as your charity of choice.

Thank you for your consideration of this request and happy shopping!

Jersey Shoreline: Nov. 20

November 20th, 2015

Jersey-Shoreline

The Jersey Shoreline  is a weekly round-up from New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium that scours the Garden State’s press and broadcasters for reports on several key topics related to the consortium’s research and outreach.

The Barnegat Bay Study

One of the biggest coastal stories this week was the release of 10 three-year research projects on the health of Barnegat Bay. The projects were commissioned by the state Department of Environmental Protection managed in part by NJSGC. Read More …

The Jersey Shoreline: Nov. 13

November 13th, 2015

Jersey-Shoreline

The Jersey Shoreline  is a weekly round-up from New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium that scours the Garden State’s press and broadcasters for reports on several key topics related to the consortium’s research and outreach.

The Institute on Science for Global Policy, in partnership with the Barnegat Bay Partnership and the Barnegat Bay Foundation will convene a forum titled “The Shore’s Future: Living with Storms & Sea Level Rise” on Nov. 20 and 21 in Toms River, the Sandpaper reported.

Dr. Michael Schwebel, the community resilience and climate adaptation specialist for NJSGC and Monmouth University’s Urban Coast Insititute will be one of the panelists during that that forum.  Read more about how Dr. Scwebel will participate by clicking here.

Read More …

NJSGC/UCI Coastal Resilience Expert to Participate in Climate Change Conference

November 13th, 2015

Dr. Michael Schwebel will serve among a select group of expert panelists in “The Shore’s Future: Living with Storms and Sea Level Rise,” a two-day conference sponsored by the Institute on Science for Global Policy from Nov. 20-21 in Toms River.

Dr. Schwebel is the community resilience and climate adaptation specialist for New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium and Monmouth University’s Urban Coast Institute.

“The Shore’s Future” will utilize a debate-and-caucus format pioneered by the ISGP.
Read More …

Jersey Shoreline: Oct. 30

October 30th, 2015

Jersey-Shoreline

The Jersey Shoreline  is a weekly round-up from New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium that scours the Garden State’s press and broadcasters for reports on several key topics related to the consortium’s research and outreach.

It was three years ago this week that Hurricane Sandy pummeled the Jersey Shore, the banks of the Hudson River and the Meadowlands, with a massive storm surge on top of a very high tide. Largely, the state media took the chance to take stock of what has happened since.

Hurricane Sandy Anniversary

Should N.J. have left Hurricane Sandy inlet open? (VIDEO) — Today’s video focuses on Mantoloking, a town on the northern barrier island in Ocean County where Sandy cut a pair of new inlets (or re-opened an old one). There, officials made a decision to quickly close the gap, driven by a desire to restore traffic and make whole the owners of a half dozen expensive homes in one of the wealthiest towns on the state. Read more at NJ.com.

Union Beach 3 Years After Sandy: Then and Now — It has been three years now since Hurricane Sandy decimated the Jersey Shore. Union Beach was one of the towns that was hit hardest by the 2012 fall storm. Read more at NJ.com.

North Jersey’s on guard against the next superstorm — From adding a pump station in Little Ferry to elevating Borough Hall in Moonachie, officials in the low-lying areas of the Meadowlands – which suffered devastating flooding from Superstorm Sandy – say they have spent the last three years fortifying their towns to better survive another major storm. Read more at the Record.

Read More …

Jersey Shoreline: Oct. 22

October 23rd, 2015

Jersey-Shoreline

 

The Jersey Shoreline  is a weekly round-up from New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium that scours the Garden State’s press and broadcasters for reports on several key topics related to the consortium’s research and outreach.

This week, a drone pilot captured footage of a young humpback whale feeding near shore in Ocean City and other locations, according to an NJ.com report. But, capturing footage like that may be soon be illegal in the barrier island town. An OCNJ Daily report says that the City Council has approved a ban on drones in the city, voted the Garden State’s Favorite Beach town, in the first of two votes required to pass the ban.

And, she’s back. Mary Lee, the now infamous great white shark, returned to New Jersey waters this week. No one is sure where she might head next. Read all about it at NJ.com.

Here’s the rest of New Jersey’s coastal news:

Coastal Processes & Concerns

Ecosystem Recovery After Dragging Debris, Homes From Waterways — Virginia Rettig, manager of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge noted that her agency removed nearly 2,000 tons of debris left behind from Sandy. The $13 million project overseen by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, involved cleaning up over 30,000 acres of saltmarsh and coastal habitat in areas of Brick, Stafford, Eagleswood, Tuckerton and Lacey. Around 1,900 tons of debris from 22 miles of coastline was removed. Read more at Micromedia Publications.

Read More …

Jersey Shoreline: Oct 16

October 16th, 2015

Jersey-Shoreline

The Jersey Shoreline  is a weekly round-up from New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium that scours the Garden State’s press and broadcasters for reports on several key topics related to the consortium’s research and outreach.

Coastal Concerns

Stinging jellyfish target of Toms River cleanup — Stinging sea nettle jellyfish, the bane of swimmers and others who enjoy Barnegat Bay, will be targeted in a bulkhead and dock cleanup Monday. State officials and volunteers will scrub bulkheads and floating docks in a bid to curb the sea nettle population. Read more at the Asbury Park Press.

Is Barnegat Bay dying? — Is Ocean County doing enough to protect Barnegat Bay? That issue dominated an amicable discussion Tuesday between the Republican incumbents on the Board of Freeholders and their Democratic challengers, during an editorial board meeting at the Neptune offices of the Asbury Park Press.

Barnegat Bay Partnership Seeks Data For State Of The Bay Report — The Barnegat Bay Partnership  is seeking data for its upcoming State of the Bay Report, an assessment of the Barnegat Bay prepared every five years. Read more at Micromedia Publications. Read More …

Black Sea Bass Season is starting up; Do you know about the bends?

October 9th, 2015

ABOARD THE OCEAN EXPLORER, in the Atlantic Ocean east of Shark River — As a complement of anglers reeled in black sea bass from the ocean floor this summer, a New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium-assembled cadre worked to tag and release undersized fish with the bends.

Mike Danko, the NJSGC marine recreation extension agent for fisheries and boating, assembled a team consisting of two scientists from NOAA James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory at Fort Hancock and from the American Littoral Society.

They were out on the 100-foot charter to identify fish with barotrauma, — commonly known as the bends — tag them and return them to the ocean floor via a descending device. More importantly, they were there to educate fisherman about barotrauma.

“We had informal discussions with approximately half of the customers on the way out to the fishing spot,” Danko said. “Slightly more than half of the people we talked with aboard the Ocean Explorer did not know what barotrauma is, but they all indicated they would be willing to use or try a descending device to increase survival rate of fish suffering from the condition.” Read More …